Saturday, April 29, 2017

"Little boxes, little boxes ..." Revisted

Welcome thoughts on the spreading mediocrity of shanty built 'settlements' over the fast fading Green Belt here. (Off site link.)

Sprawl versus ...

The 'one size fits all' approach could be enlivened by more imaginative designs like those built at Gateshead's Dunstan Staithes development.

 ... urban renewal

Short term gain will inevitably lead to long term problems, not least build quality and maintenance.

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Brown study

The Campaign to Protect Rural England (C.P.R.E.) has an up date on brownfield sites to mark a 'change of directive' to local government.

Link to posting here.

Two points come to mind and I shall make them briefly.

Tyneside has numerous undeveloped brownfield sites. They are under developed because private out-for-the-biggest-profit builders have stealthily or not so stealthily bought farmland in the Green Belt to cash in on the 'aspirational country living' market and wouldn't buil;d on brownfield unless forced to. Fortunately most are gerry builders who are being increasingly found out. Answer? Get Danish, Dutch, German or Swedish builders in to the do the job the tax evading British sprawl creators won't do.

Second point is that much of the Green Belt as it stands is merely rye grass and barbed wire. That to needs creative thinking. But is not getting any.

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Blue House

 I don't seem to be receiving any updates from a local panel charged with looking at proposals for the Blue House Motor Way Interchange that was pushed forward last year as a solution to growing traffic flows along the Central Motorway, Gosforth and Jesmond Dene Road. Large to huge new housing schemes to the north and north west of the city will require new roads. Or so it goes. (Link to recent doom laden propaganda here.)

This just in from the Campaign to Protect Rural England suggests road building doesn't produce improved traffic flows. Some of us have learned that lesson some time ago.

A link to the C.P.R.E. article on commissioned research is here.

Newcastle: A city fit for cars